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Archives for September 2013

Introduction to REVIT Part 2 – Creating the Interior of the REVIT House – Adding floors, internal walls, doors and windows and curtain walls

For Introduction to REVIT Part 2; we will now go through the process of creating the Interior of the REVIT House  by adding floors, internal walls, doors and windows and curtain walls. You will need to complete the part 1, 2, 3 and 4 tutorials to complete the project.

Through this series of tutorials you will be able to create the building model shown below working from a blank template through to drawing sheets using the standard tools and components.

These sets of tutorials have been adapted by Matthew Kinross (Coventry University)  from a tutorial “Getting Started with AutoDesk Revit Building” which was packaged with Revit2009. So big thanks to Matthew for doing the groundwork on the transcript of this tutorial as well as Paul Smith (Coventry University)  for the hard work on the accompanying videos.

The instructions below are set up as images. You can click on each page or image to enlarge to make them easier to read.

Click on the video below for the video tutorial for pages  15-18

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Introduction to REVIT part 1_15

 

 

Introduction to REVIT part 1_16

 

 

Introduction to REVIT part 1_17

 

 

Introduction to REVIT part 1_18

Click on the video below for video tutorial for pages 19-20

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Introduction to REVIT part 1_19

 

 

Introduction to REVIT part 1_20

 

Click on the video below for video tutorial for pages 21-22

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Introduction to REVIT part 1_21Introduction to REVIT part 1_22

 

Click on the video below for the video tutorial for pages  23-24

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Introduction to REVIT part 1_23

 

Introduction to REVIT part 1_24

 

Click on the video below for the video tutorial for pages  25-28

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Introduction to REVIT part 1_25

 

Introduction to REVIT part 1_26

 

Introduction to REVIT part 1_27

 

Introduction to REVIT part 1_28

 

Click on the video below for the video tutorial for pages  29-30

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Introduction to REVIT part 1_29

 

Introduction to REVIT part 1_30

 

Click on the video below for the video tutorial for pages  31-32

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Introduction to REVIT part 1_31

 

Introduction to REVIT part 1_32

Click on the video below for the video tutorial for page  33 plus extra

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Introduction to REVIT part 1_33

Click on the video below for the video tutorial for pages  34-36

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Introduction to REVIT part 1_34

 

Introduction to REVIT part 1_35

 

 

 

 

Introduction to REVIT part 1_36

 

Click on this link to take you to Introduction to REVIT Part 3

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Introduction to REVIT Part 1– Creating the project, exterior walls, views, terrain and roof

To start off were going to go through a few basic steps within REVIT to set up and create your first project. Then you will add the exterior walls, view, terrain and then finally the roof. After this tutorial the building will be only part finished. You will need to complete the part 1, 2, 3 and 4 tutorials to complete the project.

Through this series of tutorials you will be able to create the building model shown below working from a blank template through to drawing sheets using the standard tools and components.

These sets of tutorials have been adapted by Matthew Kinross (Coventry University) from a tutorial “Getting Started with AutoDesk Revit Building” which was packaged with Revit2009. So big thanks to Matthew for doing the groundwork on the transcript of this tutorial as well as Paul Smith (Coventry University)  for the hard work on the accompanying videos.

These tutorials use the basic tools that REVIT provides and it also illustrates some of the integrated documenting features of the software.  The text is updated but some of the illustrations are based on earlier versions of REVIT but wont effect the processes.

 

colour house

 

The instructions below are set up as images. You can click on each page or image to enlarge to make them easier to read. The videos are ordered in sequence with the image pages.

Click on the video below for the video tutorial for pages  1-3

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Introduction to REVIT part 1_02

Introduction to REVIT part 1_03
Click on the video below for the video tutorial for pages  4-7

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Introduction to REVIT part 1_04



Introduction to REVIT part 1_05

Introduction to REVIT part 1_06

Introduction to REVIT part 1_07

Click on the video below for the video tutorial for pages  8-10

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Introduction to REVIT part 1_08

 

 

Introduction to REVIT part 1_09

 

Introduction to REVIT part 1_10

Click on the video below for the video tutorial for pages  11-12

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Introduction to REVIT part 1_11

 

 

 

 

Introduction to REVIT part 1_12

Click on the video below for the video tutorial for pages  13-15

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Introduction to REVIT part 1_13

 

 

 

Introduction to REVIT part 1_14

 

 

 

Introduction to REVIT oage 151_01

 

 

 Thank you for taking part in the tutorial so far Part 2 can be found by clicking this link

 

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What should we be assessing in BIM Education?

What should we be looking to assess in regards to BIM in education today? Also what should we be looking to assess in the future as all parties, industry, education and research knowledge of the best BIM practices and processes evolves?  The UK Government is attempting to establish BIM learning outcomes and such but I’d like to hear first-hand off people actively involved in BIM what they feel should be assessed and taught  in Higher Education

 

Over the past few months I’ve discussed many topics revolving around BIM, the what, the why and the drivers. This week I want to follow on from a previous article on ‘The challenges of integrating BIM into Higher Education’. Many parties are now in consensus that we need to be integrating BIM in some shape or form into academic curriculum at HE level. But what exactly should we be teaching and just as important what should we be assessing students on in BIM?

 

http://www.coventry.ac.uk/

http://www.coventry.ac.uk/

Teaching BIM in my opinion is just as much about the people and processes as it is the technology, maybe even more so. This is because if you don’t get the collaborative processes right than how can you expect your staff or students to begin to tackle the more technical aspects of BIM. For members of a team to be able to accept a change in their working process there needs to be an understanding as to why any change is being pushed.  For some this maybe a slight adjustment but for many this maybe a complete culture change.   The whole business view reflects the ground level people view in this respect in that some companies are already practicing collaborative working and in office protocols etc. so they will only need minor adjustments where as other companies may need to make wholesale changes to adapt to BIM processes.

 

If education is to provide the construction industry with graduates that have the applicable skills which are required by industry then education institutes need to ensure that the skills that are being taught in lectures and classes are relevant to the realities of an ever evolving industry.  One of the key challenges I see for BIM education curricular and assessment is being able to continually keep up to date with the changing nature of the construction industry. As I’m sure many of you are aware industry guidelines and practicing policy can often change almost as often as a change in the wind.  Just look at the UK planning guidelines fiasco with bringing in changes and then making abrupt turns in policy. The same can be said for schemes like the feed in tariffs for the solar panel industry.

 

sourced - google images

sourced – google images

With this in mind I feel it’s imperative that academia tries to keep their finger on the pulse as best as reasonable possible in regards to BIM curricular. And yes this may mean that lecturers may spend weeks preparing a module syllabus only to have to completely rework it a year or two later.  Gone are the days when a lecturer can get away with turning up with the same PowerPoint’s and coursework’s year on year for 10-20 years! Well that my opinion at least.  With a continually evolving industry we need a continually evolving and adapting curriculum.  This practice should not only be restricted to BIM teaching it should be the ethos across all courses.  Many courses today are based technical aspects of the industry and with anything technical it continually gets updated and altered year on year; I’m thinking Autodesk policy here!  Culture changes are generally less regular but in the case of BIM beyond the overall wider culture change aspect there is multiple smaller changes down the BIM road. This is a natural progression as BIM feels it way through it implementation.

 

With all this in mind I’d like to evoke some discussion on what should we be looking to assess in regards to BIM in education today? Also what should we be looking to assess in the future as all parties, industry, education and research knowledge of the best BIM practices and processes evolves?  The UK Government is attempting to establish BIM learning outcomes and such but I’d like to hear first-hand off people actively involved in BIM what they feel should be assessed and taught  in Higher Education. Please feel free to join the discussion below with you thoughts and opinions. 

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